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Everybody knows the fact of how shallow a relationship between a man and a woman has become in today’s date. No wonder the term ‘gold digger’ started being used extensively in the early twentieth century to represents those people who woos a rich person in order to hold of monetary possession. Many of us know the fact that such relationships based on monetary gain cannot survive long, even more now because a study has proved. According to research published by the Brigham Young University and William Paterson University, getting hitched only for money can spell disaster for the marriage.


When someone gets into a relationship for material gains or are instigated by extrinsic motivators in the form of rewards it does not eventually turn out to be an extrinsic relationship.


“Typically, it is seen that the state of happiness does not last if it is motivated by tangible gains. The principle called hedonic adaptation gets triggered which is essentially the tendency of the human mind to return to the previous stable level despite major positive or negative experiences. What it implies is that the material gains won't be sufficient and successively repeated higher levels of rewards would be required to sustain the feeling of goodness. Simultaneously, what creates happiness and maintains relationships are the intangible things that characterise it, such as care, concern, connect, conversations, which maintain the positivity and desire within it,” said psychologist Kamna Chhibber, Head (Mental Health), Department of Mental Health and Behavioural Sciences at Fortis Healthcare.


According to Jason Carroll, the lead author of the study, materialism was associated with partners having lower levels of responsiveness and less emotional maturity. “Materialism was also linked to less effective communication, higher levels of negative conflict, lower relationship satisfaction, and less marriage stability," said Carroll, who is also a professor of family life in Brigham Young University.

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